“The Bible Proves Archaeology True”?!

When reality and fundamentalism collide

A recent magazine editorial1 began by giving well deserved criticism of a woeful article2 in the Telegraph. It then turned to focus on “disturbing trends within the brotherhood which indicate a material shift in attitudes towards the Bible,” specifically, claiming that some think the “biblical record is not historically accurate.”

The editorial concluded that “this approach seriously compromises the Christadelphian position on the inspiration and infallibility of Scripture, and we need to be alert to the implications, individually and ecclesially.” Sounds serious… Continue reading ““The Bible Proves Archaeology True”?!”

The Exodus – a cross-disciplinary perspective

Egyptologist James Hoffmeier remarked that in response to the question “do you think the early Israelites lived in Egypt and that there was some sort of exodus?” posed in a survey sent to a group of randomly selected Egyptologists, of twenty-five, nineteen answered ‘yes.’1

Hoffmeier’s anecdote appears in the the proceedings in the 2013 conference “Exodus: Out of Egypt – Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Archaeology, Text, and Memory” held at the University of California San Diego. Featuring leading experts in Egyptology, archaeology, Biblical Studies, and other related disciplines, the conference provided a cutting-edge look at the evidence for a historical basis to the Exodus tradition in the Bible.

As well as the book, the videos2 and the conference website are available for those who want to take a serious look at the seminal event in the history of Israel.

The rock that followed them

The Jewish background to an odd passage

One of Paul’s more unusual uses of the Old Testament is found in his warning to the believers in Corinth not to fall into the same complacency as some of the Israelites had on the Exodus. Continue reading “The rock that followed them”

The value of modern lexicons & dictionaries for Bible study

We always try to use the best tools for our regular day work, we should do the same in our Bible study

Today we have a wealth of modern lexical tools available to us. Yet so many people ignore all this, and use Gesenius, or Strong’s, or Young’s, or Vine’s, tools which are massively out of date, sometimes wildly inaccurate, and theologically biased.

Here’s just one example. Let’s look at the Hebrew word ‘sheol’ (grave), typically rendered ‘hell’ by the KJV (one of many reasons why it’s such a bad translation). Continue reading “The value of modern lexicons & dictionaries for Bible study”