The Exodus – a cross-disciplinary perspective

Egyptologist James Hoffmeier remarked that in response to the question “do you think the early Israelites lived in Egypt and that there was some sort of exodus?” posed in a survey sent to a group of randomly selected Egyptologists, of twenty-five, nineteen answered ‘yes.’1

Hoffmeier’s anecdote appears in the the proceedings in the 2013 conference “Exodus: Out of Egypt – Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Archaeology, Text, and Memory” held at the University of California San Diego. Featuring leading experts in Egyptology, archaeology, Biblical Studies, and other related disciplines, the conference provided a cutting-edge look at the evidence for a historical basis to the Exodus tradition in the Bible.

As well as the book, the videos2 and the conference website are available for those who want to take a serious look at the seminal event in the history of Israel.

Prophet Model: A War of Words

Building a foundation for understanding the message of the prophets

Modern prophetic interpretation is surprisingly diverse, often presenting a bewildering array of national, personal, and cosmic predictions. Opaque scriptural symbols appear to have insufficient predictive potential, making even fulfilled prophecy frustrating to understand. As blood moons pass, “significant” dates come and go, and Planet X stubbornly refuses to destroy the earth, we are forced to reflect on our approach to prophecy. Are we doing it wrong? Continue reading “Prophet Model: A War of Words”

Ten lepers and one man saved

Just shuffle. Ideally together.

As believers, we have received the miracle of life, healing from death. How will we respond? Will we show gratitude? Will we turn to learn more from the master and make him our teacher? Will we demonstrate he is our Lord and superior? Or will we not think, not let him affect our lives and maintain an external unthinking compliance which minimizes the power of the gospel? Continue reading “Ten lepers and one man saved”